Health Department

Disease Prevention

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Beat the Heat — High Temps Can Make You Sick

Today is a hot one around the Garden State. As everyone continues to go about his or her daily routines, it’s important to remember that body temperature can rise to a dangerous level, making you extremely sick. Heat-related illness and deaths are preventable. Know the signs before you become a statistic.

Signs of heat-related illness (CDC)
  • Heat exhaustion: heavy sweating; weakness; cold, pale, and clammy skin; fast, weak pulse; nausea or vomiting; fainting.
    • What to do: move to a cooler location; lie down and loosen clothing; apply cool, wet cloths to as much of the body as possible; sip water; and seek medical attention if the person vomits and continues vomiting
  • Heat stroke/sun stroke: high body temperature (above 103 degrees Fahrenheit); hot, red skin – dry or moist; rapid and strong pulse; possible unconsciousness
    • What to do: CALL 911 immediately and follow the operator’s directions – this is a medical emergency; move the person to a cooler place; reduce the person’s body temperature with cool cloths or a bath; do NOT give liquids
 Tips to prevent heat illness:
  • Always check for children and pets when leaving your car. Hot cars can kill. Leaving the windows down does not prevent them from getting heatstroke.
  • Air conditioning is the number one protective factor against heat-related illness and death.
  • Drink extra water (fluids) all day and less tea, coffee, cola and alcoholic beverages. Do NOT wait until you feel thirsty to drink – it may be too late!
  • Reduce or schedule outdoor activity for cooler times of the day, before 10am and after 6pm.
  • During outdoor activities, take frequent breaks and drink plenty of water or other fluids, even if you don’t feel thirsty.
  • Wear lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting, open-woven clothes.
  • Wear a vented hat in the sun to protect yourself from the sun’s rays. Don’t forget sunscreen!
  • If you have a chronic medical problem, ask your doctor about how to deal with the heat.

Read more

 


How is your H.E.A.R.T Hillsborough?
Disease Statistics
Handwashing Information
Lyme Disease
Pertussis
Traveler Information
Zika Virus
Flu Season



How is your H.E.A.R.T Hillsborough?
  

Risk Factors for Heart Disease Awareness Campaign Project for Hillsborough Township, New Jersey.

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Download Awareness Campaign Brochure 

Download Awareness Campaign Flyer 

 



Disease Statistics

Annual Disease Statistics

Click here to view the statistics for the State of New Jersey.

Disease Information

 



Handwashing Information

Handwashing Info

*NEW* – Head Lice

*NEW* – Hepatitis B & C



Lyme Disease

Lyme Disease is one of the most prevalent communicable diseases in New Jersey. It is not communicable person to person, but it is carried by a “vector”. It is caused by a spirochete (curvy shaped) bacterium, which is carried by the deer tick (now called the black-legged tick- the vector) to animals and people. Not all black-legged ticks carry Lyme Disease, and it is believed that a tick must be feeding on the host for at least 24 hours for infection to occur.

Lyme Disease
Click here for more information.

 



Pertussis

Pertussis 


 

Traveler Information

Planning a trip out of the United States?  Visit the CDC Travel Information page to for travel health notices, updates and vaccine information.



Zika Virus:

Zika Virus is the newest mosquito-borne virus to be reported circulating in different parts of the world. Like Zika, the Chikungunya, and Dengue Viruses are also new mosquito-borne viruses that have been circulating. Zika virus is carried by certain types of   mosquitoes, that don’t live in NJ, but may live in warmer climates in the U.S. However, there is a new resident mosquito in New Jersey, the Asian Tiger Mosquito (Aedes albopiticus), that can possibly carry these diseases, so we must watch for this occurrence.

There have not been any cases of Zika that have originated in people within the US, only in several people who returned from travel outside the country to areas where Zika has been spreading. Please read the information at the Centers for Disease Control link:www.cdc.gov/zika, about Zika Virus. You can also read about other types of diseases similar to Zika at www.nj.gov/health/cd/izdp/vbi.shtml. If you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, and are planning travel or have recently returned from Zika affected areas, please read all information on the Centers for Disease Control and NJ Department of Health websites, and speak to your physician, to be sure to exercise precautions advised, or to have testing done as per the recommendations posted. If you are a man returning from Zika infected areas, please also read the advisories and testing information. It is possible that Zika can be spread from a man through semen. So it is important to follow recommendations for prevention.

Also, please see the travel advisories regarding Zika, especially for the protection of pregnant women, and women who are planning to become pregnant at wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/zika-information.  This link also gives information about travel advisories to for different areas of the world.

The NJ Department of Health and local health departments will monitor this disease through surveillance, and as usual, mosquito control efforts and surveillance are important to controlling the spread of these diseases to the US and New Jersey. At this time, we do not have any cases of these diseases that have originated here in NJ.  Please see

Please see http://www.co.somerset.nj.us/government/public-works/roads-bridges/mosquito-control/faqs to learn about the importance of mosquito control and what you can do in our area to control mosquito-borne illness.

Please call the Hillsborough Health Department if you have any questions or concerns.


Flu Season

Check back in August for information on how to prepare for the upcoming flu season

 

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